Top tips to know if it is better to pay down debt or save

Top tips to know if it is better to pay down debt or save

If you ever wondered if it is more convenient to pay down debt or save, this article is perfect for you! Here you will discover the top tips to stay financially fit. Keep reading and answer all your questions. 

If you ever wondered if it is more convenient to pay down debt or save, this article is perfect for you! Here you will discover the top tips to stay financially fit. Keep reading and answer all your questions. 

You probably know that carrying too much debt for too long isn't good for your finances. And you may also know that you should have money put away for emergencies and other important goals. So how do you decide what's more important—paying down debt or building up your savings?

Interest rates on credit cards are often high. That can cost you considerably over time, since credit card interest typically accumulates faster than what you can earn on savings. So, if you're carrying debt with double-digit rates, it may make sense to prioritize paying it off so you can free up future funds to save or pay other debts.

If you have an emergency fund, you are in a different situation. An emergency fund provides cash you can draw on in case of: Unexpected car or home repairs, medical emergencies and essential costs like rent and groceries if your income decreases or you lose your income. 

An emergency fund provides cash you can draw on

If you don't have three months' worth of living expenses set aside for emergencies, consider that goal next. But keep paying at least the minimum on any loans and credit cards. You can take simple steps to jump-start your emergency fund.

Your retirement account earnings may produce earnings of their own, so the earlier you start to save, the more growth potential you have. Plus, some retirement contributions help you minimize taxes. You can’t borrow for retirement, so consider this goal next. As you build your retirement accounts, you can continue to chip away at debt at the same time.

As you build your retirement accounts, you can continue to chip away at debt at the same time.

Are you paying off car loans or student loans? If your rates and terms are reasonable, you may decide to stay the course with your monthly payments. For loans with higher rates, consider bumping up your payments to pay those debts faster. That way you'll save on total interest paid and have more money to allocate to your goals.

Finally, if your high-rate debt is under control, you have savings in an emergency fund and you are contributing to your retirement, it’s time to consider saving for other things. Depending on your goals, you can save for: A new car, education or a down payment on a home. Once you have those up and running, you can look toward the fun stuff like vacations and other big purchases.

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