Take a look at the top 5 greatest second careers

Take a look at the top 5 greatest second careers. If you are looking for a new start this article is a must-read. Keep reading to discover more details!

Take a look at the top 5 greatest second careers. If you are looking for a new start this article is a must-read. Keep reading to discover more details!

Are you thinking about making a big career change? You’re not alone. While no official tally exists of how often workers change careers, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that Americans hold an average of 12 jobs during their lifetimes. 

For the typical worker, at least some of those job changes will be enough of a transition counting as an entirely new career. Career changers make a pivot for all kinds of reasons, from changing interests to shifting occupational outlook, to retiring from their first career.

1- Consultant

Consultant

If you love what you do, but are ready to take your skills in a new direction, a career as a consultant might be the right fit for you. Consultants advise companies on how to improve business processes and outcomes, provide training on new technologies, or provide specialized services or advisory capabilities. Depending on your area of focus, you may be able to become a consultant by capitalizing on your existing skill set, or adding certifications to impress employers and clients.

2- Web Developer

Web Developer

Web developers are responsible for the look and feel of websites, as well as for their technical underpinnings. You don’t necessarily need a bachelor’s degree to become a web developer, but you do need a mixture of graphic design knowledge and technical know-how. If you currently lack those skills, a coding bootcamp might provide a shortcut. 

3- Teacher 

Teacher 

According to an analysis by the Urban Institute, teaching is a common second career for many older workers. There is a shortage of qualified teachers, and jobs are available. There is also an opportunity to make a difference during your next career. The Center for State and Local Government Excellence (SLGE) reports that 64% of teachers agree or strongly agree that they’re making a difference during these challenging times, and 46% said the public health crisis made their job feel more meaningful.

4- Computer Support Specialist

Computer Support Specialist

Are you always the go-to person in your household for computer questions? You might be able to parlay your technical knowledge and people skills into a second career as a computer support specialist. Some tech support staff get started with just a few postsecondary classes.

5- Private Detective

Private Detective

Private detectives work for individuals and companies, performing investigations and background checks. They perform research, conduct interviews, and run surveillance. Private detectives must be licensed in most states and typically have a background in the military or law enforcement.

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