Take a look at the most common scams that affect students

Take a look at the most common scams that affect students

Cybercrimes also may affect students. In this article, you will find the 6 most common scams that affect students. Keep reading to discover all the details!

Cybercrimes also may affect students. In this article, you will find the 6 most common scams that affect students. Keep reading to discover all the details!

As a high school or college student, you have many responsibilities such as studying for exams, holding down a part-time job and handling at least some of your own finances. While you’re doing all this, hackers may also be trying to separate you from your cash. Cybercriminals know students often have hectic schedules and maybe new to money management, making you an ideal target.

As a high school or college student, you have many responsibilities such as studying for exams, holding down a part-time job and handling at least some of your own finances.

The good news? You can protect your financial and personal information by familiarizing yourself with the most prevalent scam tactics and how to spot them.

The first and very common scam is fake apartment listings. You see an online listing for what seems to be an ideal apartment. The landlord or agent isn’t able to show you the place, but you can secure it immediately if you mail or wire a deposit, only to find out later that the ad was phony and your money is gone.

To prevent this, we recommend doing an internet search on the apartment’s address and any contact names you come across. You may find the legitimate listing for that apartment or learn that others had been scammed in the same way. If the apartment is in your area, always view it in person. In all cases, never send money without first confirming that a listing is legitimate.

To prevent this, we recommend doing an internet search on the apartment’s address and any contact names you come across.

Bogus scholarships and grants are also a traditional scam. You receive a call or email saying you earned a grant or scholarship. You’re asked to make an up-front payment for processing or related services, but the scholarship or grant money never materializes.

Contact your school to see if anyone there can help to confirm the legitimacy of the award. In addition, research the organization giving the scholarship or grant to see what information you can find out. Under no circumstances should you be required to send money for a scholarship or grant.

Related Articles

More News

More News