Phishing, vishing and smishing: All about scams

Phishing, vishing and smishing: All about scams

Check out all you need to know about the most common scams: Phishing, vishing and smishing. In this article you will find all the information about cybersecurity. Read on to find out more details!

Check out all you need to know about the most common scams: Phishing, vishing and smishing. In this article you will find all the information about cybersecurity. Read on to find out more details!

Is that unusual or even slightly disconcerting email, phone call or text really from a company you trust or a government worker? If your gut tells you something is off, it probably is. Scammers could be after confidential information such as your Social Security number, bank account details or credit card numbers, and they’re attempting to get it using social engineering—essentially, manipulating you into giving out your data.

Is that unusual or even slightly disconcerting email, phone call or text really from a company you trust or a government worker?

Social engineering messages usually have common giveaways like generic greetings (“Dear customer”), vague subject lines or unknown senders. Urgency can be another tip-off, like demands for a response or immediate action. Or they might contain an offer that seems too good to be true, like a sizable cash prize. You may also see a request to verify your personal data or to give access to your computer for a software update.

What is phishing? An email message that asks you to click on a link, download a file or reply with confidential information. There are some red flags that will help you with this kind of scams: Spelling and grammatical errors, apparent typos in the sender’s address, such as accounts@bankoofamerica.com, an unusual URL or a link that points to a different site than the one mentioned in the message, and a request not to call the sender.

Social engineering messages usually have common giveaways like generic greetings

What is vishing? A phone call or voice message from a person requesting confidential information. Pay attention to: an unfamiliar or unknown caller ID, a caller who claims to be a company employee or government official, saying there’s a problem with your account, Social Security number or taxes, a person (such as an unidentified “nephew”) in an emergency situation who needs money immediately and when a caller doesn’t answer questions or provide details about the situation. 

What is smishing? A text message asking you to click on a link or reply with confidential information. Be careful if: sent from an unfamiliar number, spelling and grammatical errors, a link promising a video, shopping deal or website. 

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