New Amazon Scam: This is How your Card Details can be Stolen

New Amazon Scam: This is How your Card Details can be Stolen

Specialists discovered a new Amazon scam. Find out how criminals can steal your card details. Read on for more information!

Specialists discovered a new Amazon scam. Find out how criminals can steal your card details. Read on for more information!

There is no doubt that cybercriminals understood that there is a great opportunity after the boom that eCommerce had during the pandemic. So it is not surprising that there is a recent campaign to spoof digital businesses such as Amazon and logistics companies for the theft of bank cards.

There is no doubt that cybercriminals understood that there is a great opportunity after the boom that eCommerce had during the pandemic.

A few days ago, the cybersecurity company ESET registered a new campaign with which cybercriminals seek to deceive their victims through email messages. They report that the receiver was selected to receive an award that can range from a high-end smartphone to various household appliances.

The design of the emails is very similar to what they officially use on Amazon, from the corporate colors to the type of buttons used, which makes them pass for real. That is why, as they warn from ESET in a statement, "it is very easy to mistake this email for a legitimate one".

In case the victim puts any of the links that the email has, they will be redirected to a website with a domain that has nothing to do with Amazon's, but has a design very similar to that of the ecommerce giant. When you arrive at the site you are asked to fill out a simple survey.

In case the victim puts any of the links that the email has, they will be redirected to a website with a domain that has nothing to do with Amazon's

After answering these questions, the victim will access a website that will show three of the alleged gifts available, including an Android smartphone, an iPhone and a high-end vacuum cleaner, with the corresponding button to add it to the basket.

However, when processing the order, the victim is redirected to another website that has no relationship with Amazon, where they request a series of personal data, including name, surname, postal address, telephone number and email.

Once the relevant fields are filled in, the page requests new information that is what the criminals are really interested in: the credit card numbers in order to impersonate the victim and make payments on their behalf.

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