Jeff Bezos’s simple rule for building a successful business

Jeff Bezos’s simple rule for building a successful business

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has shared the simple business hacks that helped him build a trillion-dollar company.

Some years ago during an interview, he said:

“All of my decisions in business and in life have been made with heart, intuition, guts, not analysis.”

"If you can make a decision with analysis, you should do so. But it turns out in life that your most important decisions are always made with instinct and intuition", he told the crowd gathered at the Washington Hilton.

All of Bezos's decisions in business and in life have been made with heart, intuition, guts, not analysis.

He also emphasized how important a consistent 8-hour sleep cycle has been in his working life. 

"I go to bed early and I get up early […] I prioritize it. I think better. I have more energy. My mood is better.”

"Is [fewer hours of sleep] really worth it if the quality of those decisions might be lower because you're tired or grouchy?”

For Jeff Bezos, customer service is the key to every successful business.

In 1999, he had a simple rule for doing customer service and meeting customer needs, according to a new book about the phenomenal rise and continued dominance of Amazon. “It has to be perfect”.

Want to learn more about Amazon's successful history? This is the book you should read!

He also made some very interesting comments about the importance of being innovative.

For Jeff Bezos,  innovation and perfection go hand in hand.

Innovation and perfection go hand in hand. To build any business, you have to be perfectly innovative. Create the exact product people need at the perfect time (and throw-in it at the right price as well). Companies fail because they are imperfect at innovation. Yet, it goes much further than that. You can build an average company that is not quite perfect, but having a long and fruitful career in business, running a marketing department, or catalyzing employees at a startup to think differently about a new product, or gaining the unparalleled brand recognition of Amazon requires something far greater. Perfection has to touch every corner.

For him,  innovation and perfection go hand in hand. In relation to that he said:

I’ll give you one example. When it comes to email communication, I’ve seen employees who make frequent foibles. I’m not talking about grammar. They come across as a bit rude or condescending, they treat customers poorly, or they're too abrupt. Do that over a few years and eventually the recipients of those emails (also known as the people who send you money) start to view your organization as a bit average or even toxic. 

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