Jeff Bezos could be the world’s first trillionaire by 2026

Jeff Bezos could be the world’s first trillionaire by 2026

Despite having lost nearly $38 billion in his recent divorce and the global pandemic, he could be on track to become the world’s first trillionaire.

According to an analysis from Comparison, his wealth is growing at a rate of 34% per year. If this continues to happen, he could become a trillionaire by 2026. His net worth is $148 billion, thanks to the $28 billion bump in 2020, according to Bloomberg.

If his personal fortune keeps growing at the current rate, he could become the first trillionaire by 2026, at the age of 62. Over the past five years, his wealth has grown at a rate of 34%, and that’s despite him turning over Amazon shares worth an estimated $38 billion to his ex-wife, MacKenzie Bezos, as part of their divorce settlement.

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The comparison looked at 25 of the richest people on earth and found out that only 11 have real chances of becoming trillionaires during their lifetimes. Bezos is likely to get there first, but Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg could be the youngest: with his current growth rate, he could become a trillionaire by 2036, when he will be 51.

In order to determine Bezos’ personal wealth, Comparison used Forbes billionaire list, but they took data from September, so the analysis does not account for the gains Bezos has seen during the coronavirus pandemic, which has caused Amazon stock to skyrocket. But he is not the only one who benefited from the pandemic. 

While coronavirus has forced 36 million Americans to file for unemployment, US billionaires saw their wealth collectively rebound by $282 billion between March and April, according to a report from the Institute for Policy Studies.

See also: 5 celebrities that donated money to help during the pandemic

However, as Bezos’ wealth continues to grow thanks to Amazon, the company is facing growing criticism for its treatment of workers during the pandemic, including its recent move to drop a $2 hourly raise for warehouse employees.
 

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