Even Mild Cases of Covid-19 can Leave Consequences on the Brain

Even Mild Cases of Covid-19 can Leave Consequences on the Brain

The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the possible long-term effects of Covid-19. Keep reading to find out all the information.

The new findings, although preliminary, are raising concerns about the possible long-term effects of Covid-19. Keep reading to find out all the information.

More than a year and a half after the pandemic began, knowledge about the effects of Covid-19 disease on the body and brain continues to grow; and one of the focuses of concern is in the long-term impacts that the coronavirus could have on biological processes such as aging.

In this sense, the cognitive neuroscientist Jessica Bernard explains in The Conversation that prior to investigating the way in which normal brain changes related to aging affect people's ability to think and move, she was interested in exploring the role of the coronavirus. in this process.

A preliminary but large-scale study published last month explored brain changes in people who had had Covid-19. Counting on brain images from more than 45,000 people in the UK since 2014, the research team analyzed that data and brought together those who had been diagnosed with coronavirus for further examinations.

Comparing who had been infected with those who had not, in addition to differentiating according to age, sex, risk factors and some other variables, such as health and socioeconomic level; found marked differences in gray matter.

Specifically, the thickness of the gray matter tissue, which is made up of the cell bodies of neurons that process information in the brain, was reduced in the group that had experienced coronavirus, as opposed to the typical patterns seen in the group of not.

Bernard maintains that it is normal to see in the general population some change in the volume or thickness of gray matter as people age, however, the changes observed in those who became ill were greater than normal.

In fact, when the researchers separated people who got seriously ill - enough to require hospitalization - the results were the same as for those who got more mildly ill.

On the other hand, they also investigated changes in performance in cognitive tasks and found that those who had contracted SARS-CoV-2 were slower in processing information, compared to those who had not.

Related Articles

More News

More News