Cybersecurity: Most common coronavirus scams

Cybersecurity: Most common coronavirus scams

Covid-19 has changed our lives in multiple ways, one of them is the increase in cybercrimes. It has a lot of sense because we rely more than ever on technology. Keep reading to avoid the most common cyber threats!

Covid-19 has changed our lives in multiple ways, one of them is the increase in cybercrimes. It has a lot of sense because we rely more than ever on technology. Criminals are taking advantage of the current environment by repurposing established cybersecurity scams to offer health information or safety resources while delivering malware or stealing personal information.

A really ordinary scam has to do with a downloadable app for tracking coronavirus cases, which resembles maps created by legitimate public health institutions but contains malware that can infect or freeze devices.

A really ordinary scam has to do with a downloadable app 

Phishing scams turn very popular these days. They consist of fraudulent emails that appear to come from the World Health Organization, the Center for Disease Control or charitable organizations and request personal information or urge recipients to click on malware-infected links.

You also need to be aware of robocalls offering coronavirus treatments or assistance with government stimulus payments in which personal information is requested.

If you want to protect your personal information and devices there are multiple things you can do. Only use wireless networks that are secured and require a password. Be sure to change the password on your home router from the factory setting, and create a new password that is at least eight characters long. You must restrict your use of all public Wi-Fi networks!

If you want to protect your personal information and devices there are multiple things you can do. 

Don’t fall for the bait and verify the URL of any site you visit, particularly if you are loading it for the first time in your browser. Don’t respond to emails from unknown senders and verify your messages. 

Finally, if you suspect you were a victim of cybercrime you must act quickly and call the police, document everything about the incident, change all passwords and call your bank. Probably, if you do all these steps you won't have major issues. 

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