China is Planning to Build the Largest Spacecraft

China is Planning to Build the Largest Spacecraft

Did you know China is planning to build the largest spacecraft ever? Yes, as you read! Keep reading this article to find out more details. Read on!

Did you know China is planning to build the largest spacecraft ever? Yes, as you read! Keep reading this article to find out more details. Read on!

Within the framework of a call from the National Foundation of Natural Sciences of China, an agency administered by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the country; A project will seek to study the feasibility of building ultra-large spacecraft up to a kilometer long.

Within the framework of a call from the National Foundation of Natural Sciences of China, an agency administered by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the country

It is one of five funded projects, each of which will receive around 15 million yuan (2.3 million US dollars), and the goal of such a structure would be to provide a platform to spend more time in space.

Although it still has a long way to go - the initial study will take place in five years - the foundation is asking scientists to investigate new ways to design massive, lightweight spacecraft in a way that is easier to put into orbit.

Obviously launching a spacecraft of that size would be impossible with a single rocket, so the schematic posted on the foundation's website suggests sending separate modules into space and then assembling the massive structure in orbit. Once there, it would be powered by solar energy and would communicate with Earth through microwave signals, they point out.

On the other hand, he adds that this ship "is an important and strategic part of the future use of space resources, the exploration of the mysteries of the universes and survival in space for prolonged periods."

On the other hand, he adds that this ship "is an important and strategic part of the future use of space resources, the exploration of the mysteries of the universes and survival in space for prolonged periods."

Although it may sound like science fiction, former NASA chief technology officer Mason Peck told LiveScience that the idea is not entirely far-fetched and that the challenge is more a matter of engineering than fundamental science. "I would describe the problems here not as insurmountable impediments, but as problems of scale," he said.

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