Why Didn't Steve Jobs Let his Children use Apple Products?

Why Didn't Steve Jobs Let his Children use Apple Products?

Steve Jobs did not let his children have an addiction to technology and led a very particular way of life to be one of the maximum references it. Read on!

Steve Jobs did not let his children have an addiction to technology and led a very particular way of life to be one of the maximum references it. Read on!

In an interview that Steve Jobs gave to the journalist Nick Bilton of The New York Times in 2010 a striking fact emerged. A question was the trigger for an unthinkable revelation.

- "So ... your children must love the iPad, right?" Asked Bilton, in the context of the recent appearance on the market of the company's first Tablet.

- "They haven't used it," Steve Jobs answered. The reason? "We limit the amount of technology our children use at home," he explained.

"So ... your children must love the iPad, right?"

"I'm sure I answered with a gasp and stunned silence. I had imagined that the Jobs family home was like a nerd's paradise: the walls were giant touch screens, the dining room table was made of iPad tiles. and that iPods were distributed to guests like chocolates on a pillow, "says Bilton in a note published in 2014.

"'No,' Jobs told me, 'not even close.'"

Instead, each day Steve Jobs would gather the family together and "would be bent on dining at the big long table in his kitchen, arguing about books and history and a variety of things. Nobody ever took out an iPad or a computer. kids didn't seem addicted to devices at all, "explains Walter Isaacson, author of Steve Jobs, one of his most famous autobiographies.

Steve Jobs is not the only case. Although it may seem contradictory, other managers and entrepreneurs in the world of technology also apply this rule at home to limit the use of devices to their children.

Bill Gates' children did not have a cell phone until they were 14 years old; Tim Cook doesn't like his nephew using social media; Evan Williams, Founder of Blogger, Twitter and Medium, Replaces iPads with Hundreds of Physical Books for His Children; Chris Anderson, CEO of 3D Robotics and former editor of Wired, set time limits and parental controls on all devices in the home.

Steve Jobs is not the only case.

"My children (6 to 17 years old) accuse me and my wife of being fascists and being too preoccupied with technology, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules. That is because we have seen the dangers of the first-hand technology. I've seen it in myself, I don't want it to happen to my children, "he defends.

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